Monday, October 02, 2006

Heal Thyself

I've started seeing a new therapist. We're still getting to know each other, so I'm not yet convinced that I'm going to stay with him long-term. Getting to know someone new is always awkward, and there are always questions like:
- Can I trust this guy?
- What is his psychoanalytical style/methodology?
- On which side do the noses go when we kiss?

But I do believe in the theraputic value of counseling so I'm going to give it a couple of sessions before I make a decision.

He started out by asking a few basic questions about me and why I had decided to seek help. I've already admitted to you my occasional bouts of depression, though I don't think that's my chief complaint these days. He then went on and on for about 20 minutes giving me a bunch of background info and his initial diagnosis. That he talked so long is one of the things I'm not so crazy about, but he promised to listen more next time. One of the things he asked me to work on for next time is what do I want him to know about me?

At first I thought this would be an easy question. I could just print out a couple pages from the blog at which point he would suggest a full-time, in-patient facility. On the other hand, I don't think I want him reading the blog (I'm no Steve-the-mildly-unwell, after all) and, of course, printing out webpages onto paper is just silly and I can't abide anyone who would do such a thing.

The more I think about it, the more I think he needs to know about me, and I've gone from writing a short paragraph to an entire lecture series with slides and full-color handouts (in a convenient 3-ring binder, with extra room for notes or doodles and one of those bitchin' ruler/paper-guides). But the session is only an hour and I need to allow time for a Q&A at the end, so I'll have to self-edit wisely. How would you approach this question?


Could this guy LOOK like a bigger dork?Know your World Leaders: (#4 in the series)
I feel I should clarify. There are only two nations with a singular head of state who are also sovereigns, and both are sultanates. Although the previous leader is the Dragon King and titular (*snicker*) head of state, he is not the head of government. So when I introduce to you to a world leader who is a king or queen, such as today's entry King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden, please pay him his due honors but kindly address statutory matters to the appropriate elected official (in this case, Prime Minister Hans Göran Persson). Thank you.

Among the many interesting facts about His Highness is the fact that his last name is NOT Gustaf, it is Bernadotte, but royals never use their last name. I think it's because they don't want you googling them and finding out all sorts of embarassing stuff like first cousins marrying. Also, since the roman numerals are not at the end of his name, we can safely assume that they are not roman numerals and that they are intended to be pronounced. My guess is that it sounds something like "skvee" (although the Swedes probably make it more like "schkveh"). One little known fact is that with 4 Godmothers and 6 Godfathers, he is the real-life inspiration for the main character of this book. Finally, in addition to having your face on the money, the other cool thing about being monarch is getting to call your children "issue" (of which his high kinginess has 3 -- check out the youngest, Madeleine. Hubba hubba!).

[Next Time: A different world leader]

2 Comments:

At 12:06 PM, Blogger mellancollyeyes said...

Hmm that's always a bitch question...I've been asked that a few times. I usually try to point out the most prominent (and probably annoying/frustrating/irritating...) trait about me, such as "I tend to be extremely anal and opinionated and I very often run my mouth when I think I'm right." That way, although the trait is prominent and the other person will catch it right away, at least they are prepared. It's like when you are forewarned that something's boring or painful or itchy or whatever...at least you know about it.

 
At 7:16 AM, Blogger Beth said...

How can you trust therapist for $400, Alex?

 

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